Fr Nicholas Sheehy – 1728 – 1766

Fr. Sheehy Memorial Window 2014THE NEW DONATED MEMORIAL WINDOW TO FR. NICHOLAS SHEEHY —1766 INSTALLED ON 21st. JULY, 2014

Depicts aspects of the life of fr. Nicholas Sheehy.
Right hand side : Spanish connection to his seminary days in Salamanca at the Irish college
Fr. Nicholas holding his chalice of priesthood.
The two cathedrals in Salamanca are of the 12th & 16th centuries. Family unit portraying the difficulties of irish life in penal days, his resting place at Shanrahan, Clogheen.
Left side: portrays the downtrodden faces of Irish life during the persecution of penal days the penal rosary beads. The scaffold of martyrdom for fr. Sheehy in clonmel prison, 15 march, 1766
his signature from the Salamancan archives – 1742 and now in Maynooth.
Top glass: crest of university of Salamanca given by Pope Alexander iv – in the year 1134.
Salamanca now an unesco world heritage site since 1988. The penal laws were passed from 1698 to 1715.
They were repealed from 1783 to 1829.

The Irish Parliament sitting in Dublin, comprised almost entirely of a small group of wealthy, land owning members of the established church, passed severe far reaching penal laws applicable only to Catholics, Presbyterians, Quakers and other religious denominations in Ireland.

Briefly, some of the laws stated that everyone must pay tithes to the established church, but only members of this church could vote, engage in politics or purchase land. The purpose in passing the laws was to ensure and maintain the position of power and privilege that they and their followers enjoyed.

Additional laws were passed forbidding Catholics to teach or practice their religion. These were intended to eliminate the faith from the country but the laws had the completely opposite effect.

At that time, before famine and mass emigration played havoc, Ireland’s population was almost twice today’s four million and a very, very large majority of these were Catholic and. determined to hold firm to the faith which they loved and cherished.
Various ways and means were adopted to defy the laws. Teachers taught the pupils in the open, at the sides of lanes and roadways. These were known as ‘Hedge Schools’, and many Irish scholars had their primary education at one of these ‘Schools’.

Priests were outlawed and hunted and moved in secret around the country to perform their religious duties. Mass was celebrated in barns and buildings, sometimes lent by Protestant sympathisers who were also victims of the laws and very active in their opposition to them.

The most famous of all the places where Mass was celebrated were the Mass Rocks. These were located in remote valleys and on hillsides to allow worshippers to disperse quickly and avoid capture in the event of discovery by forces of the crown.

THE ARTIST WHO CREATED AND DESIGNED THIS WONDERFUL MEMORIAL WINDOW : PATRICK MULDOWNEY. 087 7689347 patleros@hotmail.com
EMERALD GLASS, TULLAMORE INSTALLED THE WINDOW. 057 9351068

SPECIAL VISIT TO SALAMANCA-AVILA-SEGOVIA-MADRID 2016
TO CELEBRATE THE 250th. ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF OUR MARTYRED PRIEST, FR. NICHOLAS SHEEHY.

WELCOME.

Fr Nicholas Sheehy

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County Tipperary.
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